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Update

Patient safety is every junior doctor's responsibility

LD-PhotoIn an exclusive podcast for MPS, the global patient safety champion Sir Liam Donaldson says that junior doctors hold a prime position on the frontline of healthcare delivery, so can prevent harm by being aware of the wider system of care around them.

Speaking at a recent RSM conference, the World Health Organisation’s Director-General’s envoy on patient safety said that care is inherently unsafe so it is not enough for junior doctors to be trained in the knowledge, skills and art of medicine.

He called for junior doctors to understand the risks of the care they provide, and how they could inadvertently harm patients because of those risks.

He added: “Patient safety isn’t about criticising individual doctors or nurses, or the NHS; it is a worldwide problem, so there is an opportunity for junior doctors to play a part in solving it.

“We want the future to show systematic improvements in safety, saving lives, reducing harm, making error less common and, when it does happen, of much lower impact – junior doctors can be at the forefront of this.”
We want the future to show systematic improvements in safety, saving lives, reducing harm, making error less common and, when it does happen, of much lower impact – junior doctors can be at the forefront of this

He ended stating that the future will be determined by how well junior doctors are engaged, educated, motivated and instilled with the passion to make healthcare safer.

During the 12 years that Sir Liam was Chief Medical Officer for England and the UK’s Chief Medical Adviser, he produced a series of reports and policy initiatives that shaped public health, NHS care and clinical practice. These included smoke-free public places, regulated stem cell research and the establishment of a health protection service.

Podcast

Listen to the podcast in full here.

Sir Liam’s podcast is one of a number of podcasts covering topical issues that are available for MPS members.

55 foundation doctors referred to GMC

The latest Foundation Programme Annual Report has been published. The statistics reveal that between 2010 and 2011, 30 F1 doctors (0.4%) and 25 F2 doctors (0.3%) were referred to the General Medical Council (GMC) for fitness to practise issues.

The report also reveals that:

the top three CCT specialties taken by F1s were general surgery (83%), general (internal) medicine (64%) and geriatric medicine (24%)
  • the top three CCT specialties undertaken by F2 doctors were general practice (42%), emergency medicine (41%), and general (internal) medicine (20%)
  • 59% of F1 doctors and 61% of F2 doctors are female
  • 71% of F2s went on to specialty training/FTSTA in the UK.

To read the full report visit: www.foundationprogramme.nhs.uk.

Between 2010 and 2011, 30 F1 doctors and 25 F2 doctors were referred to the General Medical Council for FTP issues

GMC cuts annual fees

The GMC has cut fees for all doctors for the first time since 1970. From April 2012, the Annual Retention Fee will be cut from £420 to £390 for doctors holding registration with a license to practise, and from £145 to £140 for doctors holding registration without a license to practise. Provisionally registered doctors will pay £95.

For information visit: www.gmc-uk.org/news/11533.asp.

Junior doctors will lose most in pension reforms

Junior doctors will lose out most in the public sector pension reforms, says the BMA.

A 25-year-old junior doctor who goes on to follow a consultant career path could pay £240,000 in additional lifetime contributions over the current scheme and work eight years more

According to the medical union, a 25-year-old junior doctor who goes on to follow a consultant career path could pay £240,000 in additional lifetime contributions over the current scheme and work eight years more, until the age of 68, to receive a full pension.

Their annual pension is likely to be slightly higher, at around £70,000, but it will be based on career average earnings rather than final salary and received for fewer years, giving them less over the course of an average retirement.

Overall, a 25-year-old junior could be paying 2.25 times more in to the scheme to get around 16.5% less out of it.

Overall, a 25-year-old junior could be paying 2.25 times more in to the scheme to get around 16.5% less out of it.

For more information visit:

Event

When

Where

What

Useful links

MPS Communication Skills workshops Throughout the year Across the UK Mix with other specialties and lower your risk at MPS’s popular communication skills workshops

Find out more

National Conference for Aspiring Surgeons 24 March 2012 University of Bristol There will be opportunities for discussion with consultant surgeons and the Royal College about a career in surgery

Find out more

World Extreme Medicine Conference 15-18 April 2012 London This conference aims to deliver knowledge, insight and innovation in the field of remote medicine and its sub-disciplines, such as expedition and wilderness, pre-hospital and disaster and relief Find out more
Medicine and the Media (MWF Spring meeting) 11 May 2012 Colchester The conference aims to enable doctors to better understand how they can interact with the public through the media and its various forms Find out more
Foundation Programme Sharing Event 13 June 2012 London This is a great opportunity for foundation doctors to present and share experiences of good practice Find out more